Skip to main content
European Commission logo
Migration and Home Affairs

General information: situation on trafficking in human beings

Combatting trafficking in human beings has been a political priority for Denmark since 2002.

Trafficking in human beings is a criminal offence that often occurs in secrecy. Many victims of trafficking in human beings are reluctant to seek help and support, for example because they fear their traffickers. As a result, the field of trafficking in human beings is regarded as under-reported.

Between 2007 and 2020, 968 persons were identified by the Danish authorities, in particular the Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings, the Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration (SIRI), the Danish Immigration Service (US) and the courts. As victims of trafficking in Denmark as shown in figure 1 according to the Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings.

Denmark figure-1

Of the 968 persons identified as trafficked in Denmark, 717 persons were victims of trafficking into prostitution as shown in figure 2. The first victims of trafficking into forced labour were identified in 2009 and a total of 111 persons have been identified as victims of trafficking into forced labour from 2009-2020. 95 persons have been identified as victims of trafficking into criminal actions from 2010-2020. The first victims of trafficking into criminal actions were identified in 2010.

In 2020, the first victims of trafficking in human beings into practices similar to slavery were identified. A total of three persons have been exploited into practices similar to slavery. In 2020, five Danish citizens were identified as victims trafficked into sexual exploitation. Trafficking of Danish citizens has happened three times before (in 2010, 2013 and 2017).

Denmark figure-2

As shown in figure 3, the majority of identified victims are women with a total of 764 persons (79 %). Male victims of trafficking account for 20% and trans persons account for 1% of the total number from 2007 to 2020.  Children and young adults under the age of 18 are primarily exploited into criminal acts and secondly exploited into sexual exploitation.

Denmark figure-3

The vast majority of identified victims of trafficking in human beings were adults 912 (94%) while 56 persons (6%) were children and young adults under the age of 18. Figure 4 shows the age distribution per year for identified victims of trafficking in Denmark.

Denmark figure-4

Find more statistics and data on trafficking in Denmark on the Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings website.

Institutional, legal and policy framework

The Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings was established in 2007 and is responsible for coordinating and developing the nationwide social efforts for victims of trafficking and of involved parties. The Centre is anchored in the National Board of Social Services and reports to the Minister for Equal Opportunities.

A large number of relevant public authorities and agencies are involved in combating trafficking in human beings, such as the national and local police, the Danish Return Agency, the Danish Immigration Service, The Danish Customs and Tax administration and the Agency for Work Environment. NGOs are also important partners in the efforts to combat trafficking in Denmark.

To provide overall policy coordination, an inter-ministerial group meets ad hoc. The following ministries and departments are part of the inter-ministerial working group:

  • The Department for Gender Equality (chair)
  • The Ministry of Employment
  • The Ministry of Justice
  • The Ministry of Immigration and Integration
  • The Danish Immigration Service
  • The Danish Return Agency
  • The Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration
  • The Danish Agency for Work Environment
  • The Ministry of Taxation
  • The Ministry of Health
  • The Ministry of Foreign Affairs
  • The Ministry of Social Affairs and Senior Citizens

In addition, the Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings is responsible for a number of local and regional meeting forums, networks and partnerships. Relevant public and private actors are brought together with the purpose of strengthening their involvement in countering trafficking in Denmark. That includes to uniform case management through binding collaboration, knowledge sharing, training and teaching. 

In case of, for example, new challenges, new tendencies or practical obstacles, The Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings establishes ad hoc collaboration forums with relevant actors and NGOs across the country. The aim is to be flexible, have more operational collaboration and gather responsible players with the goal of managing a current challenge or a problem related to trafficking in human beings.

Relevant legislation

Section 262a of the Criminal Code criminalizes trafficking in human beings. The section was inserted into the Criminal Code in 2002 in accordance with United Nations Convention against Transnational Organised Crime and the Protocols thereto and in accordance with the Council of Europe’s Framework Decision of 19 July 2002 on combatting trafficking in human beings.

In 2002, Denmark also ratified the UN-Protocol to prevent, suppress and punish trafficking in persons, especially women and children (the so-called Palermo Protocol).

In 2007, Denmark ratified the Council of Europe’s Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings, on the protection of victims of trafficking and the safeguard of their rights, which has been binding since February 2008.

Denmark is not bound nor subject to application of directives 2011/36/EU and 2004/81/EC, in accordance with Articles 1 and 2 of the Protocol on the position of Denmark annexed to the Treaty on European Union and to the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. Notwithstanding these provisions, in 2012 Denmark raised the maximum penalty for trafficking from 8 to 10 years of imprisonment, extended jurisdiction in cases regarding trafficking and extended the provision to include “exploitation for criminal activities” in order to bring Danish criminal legislation in line with the EU directive 2011/36/EU on preventing and combating trafficking in human beings and protecting its victims. Further, in 2013 Chapter 24 of the Criminal Code on sexual crimes was modernized, which resulted in amendments of the wording in section 262a on trafficking in human beings.

The International Labour Organisation’s (ILO) eight core conventions are today considered fundamental workers’ and human rights. These conventions also include the purpose of eradicating forced labour. Denmark has ratified 72 International Labour Organisation’s conventions, including the “Forced Labour Convention (C29)” and the “Abolition of Forced Labour Convention (C105)”. The International Labour Organisation decided at its 2014 International Labour Conference to intensify efforts against forced labour by adopting a protocol to the Forced Labour Convention (C29), accompanied by the Recommendation (R203) on additional measures to effectively combat forced labour. The 2014-Protocol was ratified by Denmark in 2017.

Pursuant to the Administration of Justice Act, section 722(2), charges can be withdrawn in a criminal case regarding trafficking, if it is concluded that the person charged with a criminal offence is trafficked, that the crime the person charged with a criminal offence is accused of is directly linked to the trafficking case, and if the crime is not characterized as a serious crime. Examples of withdrawal of charges against victims of trafficking are cases of illegal stay, forgery of for instance ID-documents, begging, theft etc.

Danish Aliens Act

There are a number of sections concern the rights of victims of trafficking:

  • Section 9c(5): A temporary residence permit can be issued to an alien whose presence in Denmark is required for the purpose of investigation and prosecution. The residence permit cannot be renewed for a period longer than the duration of the investigation or prosecution.
  • Section 26a: The authorities must take into consideration – when making a decision regarding an expulsion order – if the ground for the expulsion is closely related to the person being a victim of trafficking.
  • Section 33(6): A reflection period of 30 days must be provided to all presumed victims of trafficking, regardless of victim’s willingness to co-operate with the authorities. This reflection period can be extended up to a total of 120 days if the victim opts for voluntary return to the country of origin and if he/she is cooperating with the authorities in this regard.
  • Section 56a(9): The Danish Immigration Service is upon request required to assist unaccompanied minors in launching an investigation for their parents – unless certain circumstances are present.

National action plan

There is a broad political agreement in the Danish Parliament behind the fight against trafficking in human beings. Since 2002, National Action Plans (NAP) to Combat Trafficking in Human Beings has been in place, following the United Nations protocol on trafficking in human beings (the so-called Palermo-protocol) from 2000 and the EU framework decision from 19 July 2002.

The Minister for Equal Opportunities is responsible for the coordination and implementation of the National Action Plans to combat trafficking in human beings in Denmark. The Department for Gender Equality currently placed in the Ministry of Employment chairs the inter-ministerial working group anchoring the National Action Plans.

A new National Action Plan is expected to be adopted for 2022-2025.

The current National Action Plan 2019-2021 sets the framework for work in combatting trafficking in human beings. It continues and further develops previous efforts in the area and it ensures that Denmark will continue to meet international conventions and obligations. The National Action Plan 2019-2021 addresses the following areas:

  • prevention and outreach work
  • victims identified and offered assistance and support
  • traffickers are prosecuted
  • knowledge and coordination between players

Read more about the Danish National Action Plans on the Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings website.

Protection of and assistance of the victims

The Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings coordinates the support and assistance offered to victims of trafficking in human beings in Denmark to ensure a holistic and harmonised support.

The social efforts to provide protection and assistance to victims of trafficking in Denmark consists of the following elements:

  • Outreach: To locate and make contact with any person who might be subject to trafficking in human beings.
  • Identification: To officially identify victims of trafficking in human beings.
  • Direct assistance: To provide assistance and support to identified victims as according to the National Actions Plan.

Authorities such as the Police, the Danish Tax Agency, the Danish Working Environment Authority and the Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration typically have the first contact with potential victims of trafficking in human beings through their ordinary control activities, for example on construction sites, in restaurants, and in the transportation sector.

In addition to the authorities' efforts, a number of NGOs and the Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings are currently carrying out outreach work in the form of social and health services targeted at potential victims of trafficking in human beings, especially among foreign women in prostitution.

The Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings is responsible for a national hotline targeting authorities such as police, tax authorities, immigration authorities, working environment authorities and front line personnel, victims of trafficking and private persons, who can report possible cases of trafficking in human beings.

In Denmark, there are three procedures in place for granting the status of victim of trafficking in human beings, depending on whether the person concerned is regularly or irregularly present in the country or whether the person has been charged with a criminal offence.

  • In the first case, the Danish Immigration Service grants the status of victim of Trafficking in human beings. The decision of Danish Immigration Service is made taking into account information from the Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings and other relevant actors.
  • In the second case, the Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings grants the status of victim of trafficking based on interviews conducted by social workers.
  • In the third case, the court can grant the status of victim of trafficking if the person concerned has been charged with a criminal offence. Following the decision of the court, the Danish Immigration Service will grant the reflection period, if the person is irregularly present in Denmark.

All victims of trafficking are offered 30 days of reflection in accordance with the Danish Aliens Act (see the section on legislation for more information). The reflection period may be extended up to 120 days, if the victim cooperates with social organisations, the Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings, and the Danish Return Agency on the assisted voluntary return scheme. In addition, all victims are offered individually tailored and co-ordinated support based on the victim’s needs and regulated by the Danish Aliens Act and National Action Plan. The array of assistance is not dependent on the victim’s co-operation with the investigation of a case against the traffickers. The assistance includes special accommodation (for instance shelters targeted trafficked women), extended access to medical services, access to legal counselling and assistance, psychological support and as mentioned assisted voluntary return.

The Danish Return Agency is responsible for implementing assisted voluntary return and reintegration programme. This is conducted via external reintegration partners worldwide. In cooperation with the trafficked person, the Danish Return Agency organises the return and reintegration in collaboration with The Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings, including reception, housing, activities and provision in the first 12 months in the country of return. The assisted voluntary return includes an allowance and can entail health and psychosocial support, education, vocational training or financial assistance to start a small business. The external partner organisation monitors the return for 12 months in the country of reintegration.

Special services to children and young adults under the age of 18

Children and young adults under the age of 18 are considered a particularly vulnerable group. Special protective measures are in place in relation to minors who are identified as victims of trafficking in human beings. It is the National Action Plan, the Danish Aliens Act, and the Danish Consolidation Act on Social Services and The Council of Europe Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings that provide a number of services for the children.

Most of the minors identified as victims of trafficking in human beings in Denmark are unaccompanied and they seek asylum or are irregular migrants. A broad range of stakeholders including the Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings, the Red Cross, the Danish police, the Danish Immigration Service, the Danish Return Agency and the municipalities are involved in the efforts addressed at potential and identified victims of trafficking. Equally important are staff in for example the asylum reception centres, social organisations conducting outreach work, child welfare institutions and the penal system, including institutions for young criminals. These actors play an important role in ensuring early identification and support in accordance with the National Action Plan. Children and young adults under the age of 18 that are victims of trafficking in human beings and seeks asylum are accommodated in asylum centres for children. Some children and young adults, for example boys from North Africa whose behaviour are influenced by the rough environment in the streets can be placed in units developed to meet the special needs of this group. All unaccompanied minors will be appointed a personal representative to ensure their interests while they are in Denmark. The representative will support the child in any ongoing case and support the child on a more personal level. If the child has no contact with his/her parents, a search for the parents or other relatives will be conducted, if this is in the best interest of the child.

As a part of the special service and prevention efforts Red Cross has developed a screening tool, so all unaccompanied minors arriving in asylum centres are screened for indicators of trafficking in human beings.

Prosecution of traffickers and perpetrators

Trafficking in human beings is a serious crime, and the fight against trafficking has in Denmark been one of the crime areas subject to systematic and nationwide police monitoring.

Since 2006, the Danish National Police has provided the overall framework for the policing efforts, and up to 2010, these efforts were based on the National Police’s strategy for increased police action against prostitution. Since 2011, the fight against trafficking in human beings has been increasingly decentralized to individual police districts as a result of experiences and lessons-learned, for example each district has a contact person with specialized knowledge on trafficking in human beings.

In March 2021, the Danish National Police has revised a classified guide detailing efforts in this area to support the police districts’ handling of cases concerning trafficking in human beings. The guide contains a general description of the different types of trafficking in human beings including trafficking of children, trafficking into prostitution, forced labour and criminal offences.

The Danish National Police work towards strengthening partnerships between the police and other relevant partners such as the Tax authorities to ensure coordinated efforts against trafficking in human beings. In addition, the National Police look into possibilities of cooperation with other authorities to carry out profiling of potential victims of trafficking in human beings, for example in connection with applications for work permits.

The Director of Public Prosecution has published a set of guidelines relating to the handling of cases involving trafficking in human beings in order to support the efforts of the police and the Prosecution Service in such cases. Among other things, the guidelines contain a description of the indicators of trafficking in human beings, which the police and the Prosecution Service should be aware of. The guidelines also contain a description of the different legal stages of such cases, including obtaining victims’ testimonies, residence permits to foreign witnesses during the trial, placing victims in shelters, and notifying victims of their rights to dismissal of minor charges relating to trafficking in human beings such as forgery in connection with entry into the country. Furthermore, the guidelines prescribe that victims of trafficking in human beings must be handled carefully, and that an indictment shall be waived pursuant to section 722 (2) of the Administration of Justice Act if the suspect is a victim of trafficking in human beings, provided that the alleged offence relates to trafficking in human beings and cannot be characterised as a serious crime.

Prevention

The Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings is responsible for collecting and communicating updated national data on trafficking in human beings. To prevent and combat trafficking in human beings, the centre has developed a number of activities.

The Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings educates and trains actors in the field to be able to identify and detect signs of trafficking in human beings, including ongoing training of the police, lawyers, investigators, health professionals, and staff at asylum centres, NGOs and other relevant professionals. Collaboration and training of the private sector is also an ongoing activity.

The Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings publishes an annual report on trafficking in human beings in Denmark launched at an annual conference. The aim of the report and the conference is to present updated knowledge, trends and highlighted themes.

The Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings has also developed a website with information on trafficking such as indicators, legislation, contact to a hotline and also including statistics on trafficking in Denmark. Part of the website has been tailored for primary school students, where a range of information on trafficking is disseminated specifically for school children. At the website it is also possible anonymously to report cases of trafficking in human beings or suspicion of trafficking.

Another mean of communication is a visual mobile exhibition about trafficking in human beings. The Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings has created the exhibition, which consists of a series of photographs that shows the diversity in exploitation and gender etc.

Private sector engagement

With regards to private sector engagement to prevent trafficking and discourage the demand for trafficking in human beings, the Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings has developed a tool, ‘Avoid Hidden Forced Labour – Guidelines for businesses and employers’. The guidelines are an awareness and risk management tool developed in dialogue with relevant actors. The guidelines include, among others, checklists and tools which can help a business to investigate if the business is at risk of trafficking in human beings for forced labour in its supply chain. Furthermore to prevent and reduce the risk of forced labour in the business and supply chain.The guide is part of a two-fold strategy to combat and prevent forced labour by focusing both on private sector mobilization and self-regulation as well as on the role of the authorities, inspection and regulation. 

Trafficking in Human Beings online

In 2020, The Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings launched an initiative focusing on trafficking in human beings online. The Centre, through its contact with victims of trafficking, has been informed of how online interaction facilitates several aspects of trafficking in human beings. This includes recruitment of victims through for example social media, chat fora and recruitment websites; the arrangement of logistics and transportation; advertisement of victims on prostitution platforms; the surveillance of victims both through GPS and/or surveillance cameras and other means.

The initiative aims to map existing knowledge in the area and explore the challenges and best practices of combating trafficking in human beings online. This is done through for instance dialogue with experts within the fields of trafficking in human beings, financial flows, technology and online/digital crime. One of the main purposes of the initiative is to expand cross-sectoral partnerships in order to gain knowledge from different fields and enhance development. The initiative has focused on mapped exiting knowledge in the field of trafficking in human beings online through research and dialogue with experts. Next step will be to launch initiatives in cooperation with the cross-sectoral partners, for example to prepare lists of indicators on trafficking in human beings to specific online actors.

Cross-border cooperation to address trafficking in human beings

Denmark supports international and regional organisations in combating and preventing trafficking.

For instance through bilateral funding contributions and through active participation in relevant forums such as the United Nations, International Labour Organisation, European Union, Council of Europe, Nordic Council of Ministers and the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe. Denmark is taking an active role in keeping trafficking in human beings on the international agenda. Denmark remains a strong advocate in the efforts to combat trafficking as well as in continuously improving the knowledge-sharing and cross-border collaborations.

Thus, Denmark engages in cooperation at bilateral, regional and international level with countries essential in combatting trafficking.

Denmark is represented by the Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings in the biannual meetings of the EU National Rapporteur and Equivalent Mechanism (NREM), a platform for international information exchange and collaboration between the EU Member States.

Denmark is also a member of the Council of the Baltic Sea States (CBSS) Task Force against Trafficking in Human Beings. In 2019-2021, Denmark has participated in a project called CAPE (“Competence building, Assistance provision and Prosecution of labour Exploitation cases in the Baltic Sea Region”) examining the different forms of exploitation and challenges in relation to prosecution in cases of forced labour.

In 2013, the Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings established a Nordic network against trafficking of children. The Nordic Network is an informal forum, meeting once a year with participants from relevant authorities and NGO´s working with children who are victims of trafficking. The aim of the network is to improve data sharing and knowledge exchange across countries and to enhance good practices and procedures regarding minors that cross borders. The network creates an arena for sharing concerns for specific groups and other trends in the area of trafficking.

With funding from The Nordic Council of Ministers, the Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings has initiated a new Nordic project on countering trafficking into forced labour. The project received funding in 2016 and was finalized in 2019 with the launch of guidelines: “Avoid Hidden Forced Labour – Guidelines for businesses and employers” as described previously.

The Danish National Police has a close cooperation with both Interpol and Europol, including EMPACT THB and the former ETUTU cooperation, which focused on Nigerians. ETUTU is no longer a part of Europol but is now a project financed by the member states, which Denmark still participates in.

Relevant links to national authorities/institutions websites and other relevant contacts

Government agencies

Equivalent to having a National Rapporteur, the Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings (CMM) together with the National Centre of Investigation (NCI) of the Danish National Police are today monitoring activities and the impact of anti-trafficking efforts in Denmark. The CMM and the NCI also cooperate with a range of other government and law enforcement agencies on documentation, developments and trends within the area. Below, partners in the National Action Plan and other relevant agencies and organisations are listed, including contact information.

The Danish National Police would like to note that the description regarding different efforts to combat trafficking in human beings reflects the current organisation of The Danish National Police. However, The Danish National Police is currently undergoing a reorganisation and at the same time a new national Special Crime Unit is established. The new unit will amongst others investigate complex cases, such as cases regarding trafficking in human beings by assisting the local police districts in investigation of cases of trafficking in human beings. 

The Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings

Address: Edisonsvej 1, 5000 Odense C

Telephone: +45 72 42 37 00

Hotline: + 45 70 20 25 50 (Monday to Friday from 8:30-16:00, bank holidays and weekends 9:00-15:00)

E-mail: cmm@socialstyrelsen.dk

Website: https://www.cmm.dk/english/

Task: The Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings constitutes the focal point of the national action plan to combat trafficking in human beings. The Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings is responsible for coordinating and developing the nationwide social efforts for victims of trafficking and of involved parties. The Centre is responsible for collecting data on the field and has consequently built up a resource pool of knowledge to work with the target group. The Centre educate and train relevant actors in the field to be able to identify and detect signs of trafficking in human beings. The Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings also shares the role of equivalent mechanism with the National Centre of Investigation of the Danish National Police. The Centre reports to the Minister of Equal Opportunities.

National Centre of Investigation of the Danish National Police

Address: Polititorvet 14, 1780 Copenhagen V

Hotline: + 45 45 15 42 00

Telephone: + 45 33 14 88 88

E-mail: nec@politi.dk

Website: http://www.politi.dk

Task: Based on intelligence and on an analysis-based approach, the police initiate investigations of relevant sectors in relation to trafficking in human beings. The police also carry out operations concerning prostitution and operations connected to suspicions of forced labour or trafficking into forced crime. The police can also respond to international inquiries, international coordination or Joint Investigation Teams. The National Centre of Investigation also shares the role of equivalent mechanism with the Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings. Due to the organisational restructuring of the Danish National Police, the National Centre of Investigation will be shut down on 31 December 2021.

The Minister for Employment and Minister for Equal Opportunities, Department for Gender Equality

Address: Holmens Kanal 22, 1066 Copenhagen K

Telephone: +45 72 20 50 00

E-mail: bm@bm.dk

Website: https://bm.dk/the-ministry-of-employment

Task: The Department for Gender Equality is the responsible authority for the implementation of the National Action Plan to Combat Trafficking in Human Beings. The department chairs the inter-ministerial working group anchoring the National Action Plan in Denmark.

The Director of Public Prosecutions

Address: Frederiksholms Kanal 16, 1220 København K

Telephone: + 45 72 68 90 00

Task: Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) has developed a set of guidelines in relation to trafficking in human beings, which is continuously amended in accordance with developments in the criminal area. The DPP also updates records of convictions for trafficking in human beings to ensure that the prosecutors working on trafficking cases will have the up-to-date knowledge of the development of legal practice and precedence in this area. These records are available online.

The Tax Department: Project Trafficking in human beings

Address: Nykøbingvej 76, Byg. 45, 4990 Saxkøbing (Sakskøbing)

Telephone: +45 72 37 02 42

E-mail: Projekt-Menneskehandel@skat.dk

Task: The Tax Department plays an important role in the identification of traffickers as well as victims of trafficking. The Tax Department visits many different workplaces in connection with its monitoring activities. The starting point for The Tax Departments efforts in relation to trafficking in human beings is therefore that the staff is aware of indications of trafficking in human beings during their regular monitoring activities, thereby contributing to the identification of victims and traffickers. Their work also includes gathering of reports from all branches of the organisation and informing the police and/or the Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings if any suspected cases of trafficking in human beings have been identified. In addition, The Tax Department may also provide financial data to the police in investigations of specific cases of trafficking in human beings.

The Danish Immigration Service

Address: Farimagsvej 51A, 4700 Næstved

Telephone: +45 35 36 66 00

E-mail: us@us.dk

Website: https://www.nyidanmark.dk/en-GB/Contact-us/Contact-the-Danish-Immigratio...

Task: For asylum seekers or foreigners without legal residence in Denmark, the Danish Immigration Service is responsible for assessing and deciding whether an individual is a victim of trafficking. The Danish Immigration Service determines the reflection period and is among other things responsible for the provision of accommodation and health care services

The Danish Return Agency

Address: Birkerød Kongevej 2, 3460 Birkerød

Telephone +45 30657800

Email: Hjemst@hjemst.dk

Website: https://hjemst.dk/

Task: The Danish Government decided to redistribute the operational responsibility for returns from the Ministry of Justice to the Ministry of Immigration and Integration. To implement this operational area of responsibility The Ministry of Immigration and Integration established The Danish Return Agency, which became operational as of 1 August 2020.

The Danish Return Agency is responsible for implementing the assisted voluntary return and reintegration of the victim of trafficking. 

NGOs with a contract under the Danish National Action Plan 2019-2021

AmiAmi

Address: Sjællandsgade 98 B, st.tv. 7000 Fredericia
Phone: +45 75 93 21 69

E-mail: vnn@amiami.dk

Website: http://amiami.dk/

Task: AmiAmi is a non-profit organisation supporting migrant sex workers and victims of sex trafficking through social work and healthcare. Ami holds a contract under the Danish National Action Plan to Combat Trafficking in Human Beings and cover South Jutland and Funen to offer advice and help to migrant sex workers including the services available under the action plan.

HopeNow

Phone: +45 26 16 10 12

E-mail: info@hopenow.dk

Website: http://hopenow.dk/

Task: HopeNow is a non-governmental and volunteer organisation that works to seek out, identify and work supportively and motivationally with men, women and children who are potential victims of trafficking in human beings. Hope Now holds a contract under the Danish National Action Plan to Combat Trafficking in Human Beings and mainly work in the area of Copenhagen.

The Nest International
Address: Colbjørnsensgade 12, st.tv.1652 København V

Phone: +45 33 91 48 10
E-mail: info@redeninternational.dk

Website: https://kfuksa.dk/reden-international/the-nest-international-english

Task: The Nest International is a private institution assigned to The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) Social Work. The Nest International holds a contract under the National Action Plan to Combat Trafficking in Human Beings. The Nest works with foreign women in prostitution who are victims of Trafficking in human beings. The Nest works closely together with the Danish Centre against Trafficking in human beings in the Drop-In Centre in Copenhagen and is responsible for a shelter especially for trafficked women.