Skip to main content
Logo de la Commission européenne
Migration and Home Affairs

General information- situation on trafficking in human beings

Since 1998, Italy has been at the forefront of the fight against trafficking in human beings and the protection of victims, both children and adults. The Italian model, which is still considered as a best practice in this field, was built on the principle that an effective anti-trafficking strategy should be based on a victim rights-centered approach. The main legal provisions regulating the national response to trafficking in persons were drafted in accordance with this principle and are:

  1. Article 18 of the National Law on Migration (Legislative Decree No 286 of 1998);

  2. Article 13 of the National Law against Trafficking in Human Beings (Law No 228 of 2003).

A complex structure for the assistance to trafficked persons was then developed on the basis of the above-mentioned laws and is now in place at the national level, working through three main tools:

  • Programmes for temporary assistance (implemented in compliance with art. 13 of Law No 228/2003);
  • Programmes for long-term assistance and social inclusion (implemented in compliance with art. 18 of Legislative Decree No 286/1998);
  • National Anti-Trafficking Toll-Free Helpline (a “system action” laid down in art. 2 of Ministerial Decree of 23 November 1999 regulating the implementation of art. 18 of Legislative Decree No 286/1998).

Pursuant to Legislative Decree No 24 of 4 March 2014 transposing Directive 2011/36/EU, the Department for Equal Opportunities is the national authority in charge of coordinating and promoting action for the protection of trafficked persons. The Department is currently considered as Italy’s Equivalent Mechanism on Trafficking in Human Beings and this indicates the national approach to the issue adopted by the Italian Government, which considers the protection of human rights and a gender-based approach as priorities for the national intervention system.

The main objective of the assistance action taken by the Italian Government is to allow trafficked or exploited persons to escape from the conditioning of criminal organizations or individual exploiters they are subjected to and give them the opportunity to start a new life in Italy or in their country of origin. To this end, victims of trafficking or exploitation can benefit from assisted voluntary return to their home country or a special residence permit for social protection, envisaged by article 18 of the National Law on Migration (Legislative Decree No 286 of 1998). The granting of this residence permit does not depend on reporting traffickers/exploiters to law enforcement agencies by the victim. The only necessary condition for the permit to be issued is to meet the requirements provided for by the law, participate in the “Article 18” assistance programme and complete it.

Every year the Department for Equal Opportunities launches a call for proposals to finance the assistance programmes. Both local authorities and certified NGOs can apply for funding. All programmes need to be co-funded by Regions or local authorities, with a view to ensuring the local government’s ownership of actions to be implemented in a specific region.

Data and results

Data and statistics can be provided by the DEO (Department for Equal Opportunities) with regard to the victims or presumed victims of trafficking who are beneficiaries of the first assistance and social protection projects promoted and co-funded by the DEO. These people, both adults and children, can be victims of both forced labour and forced prostitution, or other forms of exploitation (forced begging, illegal activities, etc.).

From 2000 to 2013, 665 projects were co-funded within the framework of art. 18 of Legislative Decree No 286/1998 and, from 2006 to 2012, 166 projects were co-funded under art. 13 of Law No 228/2003. From 2000 to 2013, 22,699 people (among whom 1,215 children) were assisted within the framework of the “art.18 programmes” and, from 2006 to 2012, 4,207 people (among whom 240 children) received assistance under the “art. 13 programmes” (2013 data is still being elaborated. Therefore, the above-mentioned figures might not be final).

As for data collection, the Department for Equal Opportunities, in collaboration with the National Statistics Institute (ISTAT), is working to the set up a national electronic database on trafficking in human beings focusing not only on victims, but also on traffickers, investigations and convictions. This will enable the Department to monitor on a real-time basis the number of victims assisted at the national level, as well as the services provided, and to analyse the new trends of trafficking in persons. As far as the trafficked persons’ nationality is concerned, although the percentage of Nigerians (women and young girls) remains stable (approximately 40% of the total number of victims), a decrease is registered for Eastern Europe nationals (Romania, Albania, Moldova, Bulgaria). In general, the percentage of victims coming from Africa (Nigeria, Egypt, Morocco, and Tunisia) is increasing, amounting to approximately 60% of the total number. Victims coming from Asia (China, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and India) represent approximately 10%. The other national groups are numerically quite limited. Sexual exploitation is still the most common form of trafficking in human beings (about 70%). However, persons trafficked for other purposes of exploitation (forced labour, begging, criminal activities) are increasingly being assisted through the social protection programmes in Italy. While in the past years women were mainly exploited in forced prostitution, in 2012-2013, 20% of them on average were victims of other forms of exploitation (forced labour, begging, criminal activities). As for the gender of trafficked persons, the percentage of trafficked men has constantly increased since 2007 reaching approximately 28%. Men, particularly from the Maghreb countries, China, India, Pakistan and Eastern Europe, are trafficked for forced labour not only in the agricultural sector in southern Italy, but also in the textile industry, construction and other sectors of the labour market.

A summary of this text is available in the official language of the country.

Institutional, legal and policy framework to address trafficking in human beings

Legislation

All forms of trafficking in human beings are prohibited in Italy. The specific offence of trafficking in persons was introduced in the Italian Criminal Code (article 601) in 2003 by Law No 228/2003.

However, both before and after 2003, some cases of trafficking in persons have been prosecuted under the offences of 'slavery' (article 600 of the Italian Criminal Code) and 'trade of slaves' (article 602), which have been amended by Law No 228/2003.

As far as children are concerned, the Italian Criminal Code also provides for prosecution for trafficking in children under other offences such as 'child prostitution' (article 600-bis), 'child pornography' (article 600-ter) and ‘possession of pornographic material’ (article 600-quater).

Pursuant to the Italian Criminal Code, anyone who commits trafficking in human beings shall be liable to a term of imprisonment of 8 to 20 years. However, penalty is harsher if the offence is perpetrated against minors. Prostitution per se is not criminalised in Italy, but the act of procuring is a crime under article 3 of Law No 75/1958.

Article 18 of the 1998 Immigration Law establishes that six-month temporary humanitarian residence permits may be issued to foreigners needing protection and assistance. The residence permit is renewable for one year and may be converted into a residence permit for education or work. (For further information see under 3.2 - Assistance and support provided to victims.)

Italy complies with Council Directive 2004/81/EC (on the residence permit issued to third-country nationals who are victims of trafficking in human beings or who have been the subject of an action to facilitate illegal immigration) in terms of assistance to victims (through art. 18 of Immigration Law and art. 13 of Law No 228/2003).

The Italian law does not provide for a reflection period for victims of trafficking, but all the victims participating for a three-month period in the programme envisaged by Art. 13 of Law No 228/2003 may not be deported and can therefore decide whether to participate also in the programme envisaged by Art. 18 of Legislative Decree No 286/1998 and, in this case, cooperate with the Italian judicial authorities. However, it is worth mentioning that obtaining a temporary residence permit in Italy is not conditional upon the victim’s willingness to cooperate with law enforcement or judicial authorities.

National Strategy/National Action Plan

In Italy, a complex structure for the assistance to trafficked persons has been in place since 2000. It works through three main tools:

  • Programmes for temporary assistance and long-term social protection
  • Free Helpline (Numero Verde Anti-tratta)
  • Programme for assisted voluntary return

Such a structure is coordinated and supervised at the national level by the Department for Equal Opportunities of the Italian Presidency of the Council of Ministers, which is the central public authority in charge of promoting and coordinating anti-trafficking policies and actions.

In 2014, with a view to implementing an even more comprehensive national strategy against THB, the Department for Equal Opportunities – in cooperation with all the national authorities committed to this issue and all other relevant public and private actors – will work on the development of a National Action Plan against Trafficking in Human Beings. Through an effective coordination among the Ministries, NGOs and associations involved, the Plan will be aimed at enhancing the governance of all national measures against THB and defining the effective cooperation among all national stakeholders involved in the protection of trafficked people and in the fight against THB. In particular, the Plan will focus on prevention, assistance and protection of victims, judicial cooperation, identification of potential victims, and adaptation of national legislation. The National Action Plan will also provide for the establishment of a national referral mechanism for trafficked persons, including minimum protection standards and standard operating procedures for the referral of victims to the proper service providers.

In addition, the National Action Plan will include guidelines on how to design and implement a sustainable system aiming to both prosecute traffickers and provide support to victims, while defining suggested roles for governmental institutions and the civil society. The Action Plan will be adopted by the Council of Ministers by the end of 2014 together with the Regulation on the single programme of emergence, assistance and social integration of victims of human trafficking and serious exploitation.

The projects for the assistance of trafficked persons co-funded by the Department for Equal Opportunities are implemented by NGOs which, in order to be eligible for funding, need to be enrolled in a dedicated public register. The register (Register of organizations implementing activities for immigrants – Section 2) is managed by the Ministry of Labour and Social Policies and is updated annually. 

However, not all organizations included in the list are implementing projects for the assistance to trafficked persons co-funded by the Department for Equal Opportunities.

National Rapporteur or Equivalent Mechanisms

Italy’s equivalent mechanism on trafficking in human beings is the Department for Equal Opportunities of the Italian Presidency of the Council of Ministers. Furthermore, since January 2011, the DEO has been acting also as the national observatory on trafficking in human beings. As such, it gathers documents and reports on THB, information on the national and international legal framework, as well as reference documents and judgments on a specific website providing a secure area on data collection where registered NGOs and local authorities working in this field can have access to enter information on trafficked persons assisted within the framework of the national assistance programmes co-funded by the State. As Italy’s equivalent mechanism, the Department for Equal Opportunities of the Italian Presidency of the Council of Ministers uses a special database (the so-called SIRIT – Sistema Informatizzato di Raccolta Informazioni sulla Tratta – Computerized system for the collection of information on trafficking in human beings) to monitor the phenomenon. 

Implementation of anti-trafficking policy

A national toll-free anti-trafficking helpline has been in place since 2000. Within the framework of the system actions laid down in art. 18 of Legislative Decree No 286/1998, the Department for Equal Opportunities in partnership with the Ministry of the Interior has recently broadcasted an awareness-raising campaign at the national level to promote the anti-trafficking toll-free helpline and sensitize the public on the various forms of exploitation connected to trafficking in human beings (“La tratta cancella le persone, tu puoi cancellare la tratta” – “Trafficking deletes people, you can delete trafficking”- 2009). Furthermore, the Department for Equal Opportunities was partner of the campaign promoted and coordinated by the Romanian National Agency against Trafficking in Persons within the framework of an EU-funded project and broadcasted on the Web in Romania, Spain, Bulgaria and Italy (“La tratta non perdona” - "Trafficking in persons does not forgive” - "Traficul de persoane nu iarta", 2010). The campaign was aimed at raising awareness on trafficking for the purpose of forced prostitution. Less recently, in 2007, the Department promoted, in collaboration with the AICCRE (the Italian section of CEMR, the Council of European Municipalities and regions), a national campaign called “tratta no” (“no trafficking”) to advertise the national anti-trafficking helpline. The initiative also included the elaboration of guidelines on the proper way to address the issue of trafficking by the media.

Assistance and support provided to victims

Programme for social assistance and integration

The Department for Equal Opportunities is responsible for the coordination of assistance and protection of victims. Two special programmes exist for trafficked persons in Italy:

1. Article 13 short-term programme

The Article 13 Programme offers a set of protection and initial support measures for Italian, EU and non-EU victims of slavery, servitude and trafficking. According to the law, trafficked persons can benefit from a three-month programme that, when applicable, may be extended for a further three months. Victims receive accommodation, social assistance, and health care services. Once the programme is over, they can continue to be assisted under the Article 18 Programme.

2. Article 18 long-term programme: “Social Assistance and Integration Programme”

The system to protect and assist trafficked persons currently in place in Italy is based on article 18 of Legislative Decree No 286/1998 and the related Regulation providing for the granting of a “humanitarian residence permit” to victims, the so-called “Article 18 permit”.

Article 18 of Legislative Decree No 286/1998 (Immigration Law) establishes that temporary humanitarian residence permits may be issued to foreign citizens needing protection and assistance. This permit applies to foreign citizens in situations of abuse or serious exploitation where their safety is considered to be endangered as a consequence of attempts to escape from the conditioning of a criminal organisation or as a result of pursuing criminal action against traffickers.

Once a victim is identified as such by the competent authorities, he/she can follow either:

  • The 'judicial path', which entails cooperation with law enforcement agencies; OR
  • The 'social path', which only requires the submission of a statement on behalf of the victim by an accredited non-governmental organisation or by the social services of a local authority.

Both procedures can result in the issuance of a six-month temporary humanitarian residence permit, which is further renewable for 1 year and can be converted into a student or work residence permit, if necessary.

Through Legislative Decree No 24 of 4 March 2014, the Italian legislator unified the two above mentioned protection programmes into one single programme of emergence, assistance and social integration, with a view to developing a new model more aimed at the active integration of victims of trafficking and serious exploitation. The Regulation of the single programme will be adopted by the end of 2014.

Number of victims

From 2000 to 2013, 665 projects were co-funded within the framework of art. 18 of Legislative Decree No 286/1998 and, from 2006 to 2012, 166 projects were co-funded under art. 13 of Law No 228/2003. From 2000 to 2013, 22,699 people (among whom 1,215 children) were assisted within the framework of the “art.18 programmes” and, from 2006 to 2012, 4,207 people (among whom 240 children) received assistance under the “art. 13 programmes” (2013 data is still being elaborated. Therefore, the above-mentioned figures might not be final).

Special protective measures for children

Trafficked children are provided with special assistance and care carried out by specialised services and professionals. Age-appropriate individual services are supplied under the national assistance projects for trafficked persons co-funded by the Department for Equal Opportunities, including dedicated shelters, specific counselling, medical and social support, in order to properly address the needs of such vulnerable children.

Investigation and prosecution

In Italy, investigations of human trafficking are carried out by the District Anti-Mafia Directorates (Direzioni Distrettuali Antimafia) and coordinated by the National Anti-Mafia Directorate (Direzione Nazionale Antimafia).

According to the Italian authorities, human trafficking cases have been prosecuted under the offences of 'trafficking in persons' (Article 601 of the Italian Criminal Code), 'slavery' (Article 600) and 'trade of slaves' (Article 602).

Latest initiatives/activities related to anti-trafficking policy

An urging challenge that Italy is facing is the sustainability of anti-trafficking policy in the long run, particularly with regard to the funding of the national assistance system for trafficked persons. Italy set up a very effective and comprehensive assistance system whose implementation entails high costs (8.5 million Euros per year). Costs which cannot be borne only by the central state funds anymore. Thus, the Department is starting a project to sensitize and encourage local authorities (i.e. Regions) to take over the ownership of assistance measures implemented on their territories, by making proper use of their resources, with specific regard to the European Social Fund in the 2014-2020 programming period.

The most important challenges at the national level

The Italian model of protection and assistance for victims of trafficking is in line with the European standards. However, the next step will be to ensure a system which is sustainable in the long run. The main focus will therefore be on promoting and providing public services for victims of trafficking on a permanent basis and enhancing prevention activities, including awareness raising on trafficking for labour exploitation and other forms of non-sexual exploitation, and engaging society as a whole by working with all the relevant stakeholders, such as the corporate sector, the cultural and artistic sector and academia.

Just like other European countries, Italy has been recently affected by the current economic crisis and suffered from relevant cuts in public expenditure, including in the public funding of the social protection projects implemented under art. 18 and art. 13 of the aforementioned provisions (Immigration Law No 286/1998 and Law No 228/2003). Nevertheless, although affected by strong economic cuts, the Department for Equal Opportunities has developed a strategic plan to preserve the necessary funding for the national assistance programmes for 2011 and 2012.

National Referral Mechanism

Within the framework of the National Referral Mechanism, which will be set up through the National Action Plan, guidelines will be developed for the identification of minimum standards for reception and assistance of victims, as well as for the definition of shared operating procedures. In this context, multi-agency memoranda of understanding to address THB cases will be signed, and further initiatives to promote the regular and systematic training of professionals working in this field (police officers, border police, immigration service officials, public prosecutors, lawyers, the judiciary and the judicial staff) will be undertaken. 

EU and international cooperation

Efforts to combat trafficking in human beings focus on the cooperation among law enforcement agencies, in particular on a bilateral level, in the field of organised crime and irregular migration. In 2009, Italy signed agreements with third countries including Algeria, Nigeria and Libya. This cooperation included technical assistance, such as the provision of equipment and technology to combat illegal migration, the setting up of information exchange channels, and the involvement of police forces from third countries in sea patrol operations.

Re-admission agreements have also been signed with several countries of origin, including Albania (1997), Romania (1997) and Nigeria (2000). In compliance with these instruments, whenever a citizen from such countries is found to illegally stay in Italy, he/she may be immediately expelled.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs finances projects in several countries of origin to raise awareness of trafficking in human beings among the public and potential victims. The Programme of Action against trafficking in minors and young women from Nigeria to Italy for the purpose of sexual exploitation was carried out in 2002-2004. The project was implemented by the United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute (UNICRI) and, inter alia, the Associazione Tampep Onlus (Turin). Three awareness-raising campaigns on trafficking for sexual exploitation were carried out, in collaboration with a coalition of six Nigerian non-governmental organisations.

The fight against trafficking in human beings is one of Italy’s key priorities within the framework of the Italian Presidency of the Council of the European Union. Under the new strategy for the prevention of and fight against trafficking in human beings in 2012-2016, and bearing in mind the priorities set for the 2014-2017 policy cycle, the Italian Presidency stimulates the development of coherent action to combat trafficking in human beings and encourages the introduction of a mechanism linking the authorities involved in the fight against trafficking and the institutions responsible for the recognition of international protection. Another guiding line of the Italian Government’s action is the further development of dialogue with third countries of origin and transit of migratory flows aimed at enhancing the cooperation in combating illegal immigration, while improving asylum policies and effectively managing regular immigration channels. This dialogue’s main tools are the EU Mobility Partnerships with third countries, as well as regional dialogues and processes, such as the Rabat Process, a framework for regional dialogue between the EU and the countries of West and Central Africa. In this context, Italy will host the fourth Ministerial Conference on Migration and Development. The Conference, which will take place on 26-27 November 2014 in Rome, will represent an opportunity to discuss more in depth the issue of border management and the fight against illegal immigration. Based on the model of the Rabat Process and the Dialogue between the EU and Africa on migration and mobility, the Italian Presidency is also promoting the establishment of a structured dialogue between the EU and East Africa (the so-called “EU-Horn of Africa Migration Route Initiative”/EU-HoAMRI), which will be mainly focused on the fight against human trafficking. This initiative is aimed at strengthening the regional and Euro-African cooperation on combating this phenomenon by both effectively prosecuting criminal organisations and protecting victims.

Future plans for the implementation of Directive 2011/36/EU

On 28 March 2014, Legislative Decree No 24 of 4 March 2014 establishing the “Implementation of Directive 2011/36/EU on preventing and combating trafficking in human beings and protecting its victims, and replacing Council Framework Decision 2002/629/JHA” entered into force. It had been published in the Official Journal No 60 of 13 March 2014.

In line with the holistic approach adopted by the European Union including the aspects of prevention, protection and punishment, the Italian legislator amended articles 600 (Placing or holding a person in conditions of slavery or servitude) and 601 (Trafficking in persons) of the Italian Penal Code with the aim of strengthening the punishment of perpetrators by ensuring that all forms of trafficking in human beings are punished under the Criminal Code, and with a view to providing a comprehensive definition of such crimes in compliance with the European directive. As far as minors are concerned, the conduct is punished as trafficking in persons even if the crime is not committed by fraud, deceit, threat or by promising or giving money.

As for the protection of victims of human trafficking, in accordance with the European directive, the Legislative Decree also amended the Italian Code of Criminal Procedure in order to extend the existing protection already envisaged for child victims or mentally ill adult victims concerned with the hearing of evidence to all adult victims in particularly vulnerable conditions. More specifically, art. 1 of the Decree specifies the subjects that can be considered as vulnerable persons, namely minors, unaccompanied minors, elderly persons, disabled persons, women, especially if pregnant, single parents with underage children, persons with mental disorders, as well as persons who suffered rape or other serious forms of physical, psychological, sexual or gender-based violence. With the aim of further strengthening the protection of victims, the Legislative Decree provides for the obligation to adequately inform them, especially unaccompanied minors who are victims of human trafficking, of their rights and establishes that a further decree will be adopted to define specific mechanisms for the determination of their age and their identification. In addition, Legislative Decree No 24/2014 lays down that the training pathways provided by the competent Administrations shall include, for the concerned public officials, specific training modules on issues concerning trafficking in human beings.

One of the main innovations introduced by the Decree in compliance with Directive 2011/36/EU is the recognition of the victims’ right to compensation. Such a compensation, which amounts to 1,500 Euros for each victim, shall be paid in accordance with the terms established by the Decree under the Annual Fund for Anti-Trafficking Measures. The fund already exists and, according to the relevant law, it should be fed with the proceeds derived from the confiscation of assets following a judgment of conviction.  

The Department for Equal Opportunities of the Italian Presidency of the Council of Ministers is the authority responsible for guidance, coordination and monitoring of interventions related to trafficking in human beings. Besides these tasks, the Legislative Decree officially recognizes the role of the Department as the equivalent mechanism and national contact point for the EU Anti-Trafficking Coordinator. It also aims at making the prevention and fight against this phenomenon, as well as the assistance and social integration of victims, more effective and coordinated. To this end and with a view to avoiding duplication of effort and thus improving the protection of victims, it provides for the unification of short-term and long-term assistance programmes (the so-called “art.13” and “art. 18” projects), which have been in place until the entry into force of the Legislative Decree, into one single programme of emergence, assistance and social integration guaranteeing victims adequate board, lodging and health care on a transitional basis and, subsequently, the continuation of assistance and social integration.  

Before the entry into force of the above-mentioned Legislative Decree No 24/2014 transposing Directive 2011/36/EU, the specific training on trafficking in human beings was neither regular nor compulsory for officials likely to come into contact with victims (police officers, financial police officers, immigration service officers, public prosecutors, lawyers, judges and the judiciary in general, labour inspectors, social workers and health professionals). However, training on this topic was ensured by public Administrations within the framework of the annual training pathways envisaged by the Public Administration system. From the entry into force of the legislative decree, specific training modules on issues concerning trafficking in human beings for the concerned public officials shall be included in the training pathways provided by the competent Administrations. Starting from this year, it will therefore be possible to monitor the provision of training and the number of trained officials in a more coordinated and systematic way. 

Resources

Legislation

  • Penal Code law no. 228/2003 of 11 August 2003: “Measures against Trafficking in persons” ( Legge 11 agosto 2003 n.228 Misure contro la tratta di persone) (in Italian)
    • Art 600 Reduction and maintenance in slavery or servitude (in Italian)
    • Art 601 Trafficking in persons (in Italian)
    • Art 602 Purchase or sale of slaves (in Italian)
    • Art. 604 Acts committed abroad (in Italian)
  • Legislative Decree n. 286 25 July 1998: "Immigration Consolidation Act" Article 18 so-called law "Bossi-Fini" (Decreto legislative 286/1998 Test unico delle disposizioni concreti la disciplina dell’ immigrazione e norme sulla condizione dello straniero) (in Italian)
  • Law no. 75 of 20 February 1958: "Abolition of the regulation of prostitution and the fight against the exploitation of prostitution of others" (L.20 feb. 1958 n. 75 “Abolizione della regolamentazione della prostituzione e lotta contro lo sfruttamento della prostituzione altrui) (in Italian).

National Action Plans

Pursuant to art. 9 of Legislative Decree No 24 of 4 March 2014, (Implementation of Directive 2011/36/EU on preventing and combating trafficking in human beings and protecting its victims), the Italian Government shall adopt a National Action Plan against Trafficking in and Serious Exploitation of Human Beings, with a view to defining multi-annual intervention strategies for the prevention and fight against these phenomena, as well as measures aimed at increasing public awareness, social prevention, emergence and social integration of victims.

The adoption of the first Italian Action Plan against human trafficking reflects the needs of reorganisation and rationalization of the Government action, mainly with a view to promoting the creation of synergies among the different central, regional and local Administrations involved in the fight against human trafficking and the related available resources, also considering the public expertise used to combat this phenomenon and corresponding to the four main pillars on which every coherent strategy on the subject is based at the international level (prevention, prosecution, protection, and partnership). Furthermore, it is essential to ensure the cooperation between the institutions and the third sector. The valorisation of such cooperation should be an indispensable element in the development of the Italian strategy, with a view to keeping and strengthening the integrated public and private networks operating at the local level and directed towards the so-called “multi-agency working”. Moreover, considering the transnational nature of human trafficking, the Italian Government is committed to establishing partnerships and taking collaboration measures with the other countries concerned by the phenomenon, with the aim of both preventing the perpetration of crimes and enhancing judicial cooperation and cooperation on investigating crime, as well as with a view to promoting the exchange of good practice and working tools, especially with regard to countries of origin.

The development of the Italian strategy is also in line with the European and international framework, particularly with the EU Strategy towards the Eradication of Trafficking in Human Beings 2012-2016.

The National Action Plan will be drafted in accordance with the legal and administrative basis consolidated at the EU and international level, particularly with Directive 2011/36/EU and Legislative Decree No 24 of 4 March 2014 implementing the directive and establishing minimum standards for the definition of crimes and sanctions related to trafficking in human beings. It also aims at strengthening, on the one hand, the prevention and punishment of the crime and, on the other, the protection of victims.  

As for the strategy for action of the National Action Plan, as previously mentioned, this will be defined in compliance with the EU Strategy towards the Eradication of Trafficking in Human Beings 2012-2016 (COM(2012) 286 of 19 June 2012), while taking into account the peculiarities of the Italian context and the operational strategies developed at the national level.     

A key role in the fight against trafficking in human beings is played by all the involved central Administrations (Ministry of the Interior, Ministry of Justice, Ministry of Labour and Social Policies, Ministry of Health), as well as by Regions and Municipalities, which coordinate, promote and plan the activities locally. Also third sector organisations play a crucial role as both organisations implementing some of the actions for the support of victims and points of reference at the local level.

Contacts

Government agencies

Department for Equal Opportunities – Dipartimento per le Pari Opportunità

Office for General and International Affairs and Interventions in the Social Field - Ufficio per gli Affari Generali, Internazionali e gli interventi in campo sociale
Largo Chigi, 19
00187 Roma, Italy
Telephone: +39 0667792430
Fax: +39 0667792463
E-mail: europa.po@governo.it

NGOs

Associazione Studi Giuridici sull'Immigrazione – ASGI
via Gerdil, 7 - 10152 – Torino
Telephone: +39 0114 369158
E-mail contabilita@asgi.it
Website: http://www.asgi.it (in Italian)

Caritas Ambrosiana
E-mail: caritas.ambrosiana@caritas.it
Website: http://www.caritas.it (in Italian)

Fondazione Basso Sezione Internazionale
Via della Dogana Vecchia, 5
00186 Roma
E-mail: basso@fondazionebasso.it
Websites: www.internazionaleleliobasso.it ; www.fondazionebasso.it
Telephone: 06 6880 1468/+39 3666465147

Federazione nazionale CNCA
Via di Santa Maria Maggiore, 148 - 00184 Roma
tel. 06-4423 0403 / 06-4429 2379

Emailsegreteria@cnca.it

Websitehttp://www.cnca.it/

Cooperativa Dedalus

Via Vicinale Santa Maria del Pianto - Torre 1 (11 piano) 80143 Napoli

Tel 081 7877333 – fax 081 19569518 – 392 9730570 – 392 9732693

Emailtratta@coopdedalus.it

WebsiteDedalus

Save the Children – Italia Onlus
Via Volturno, 58 - 00185 Roma
Telephone: 0648 07001
E-mail: info@savethechildren.it
Website:http://www.savethechildren.it (in Italian)